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Obvious Thing #1: I'm pretty good at starting and abandoning blogs. Why is that? Well, here's an obvious reason for my obvious fact: writing is hard. I've come to accept that (and embrace it on my best days). This is, of course, coming from someone who likes to write, but who can be intensely critical of her own writing especially when it's - yowza! - public!

When I teach writing, I like to analogize writing with exercise. It's easy to talk yourself out of doing it and even easier to come up with excuses not to do it. When you do it, it is painful, but gradually (graaadually) it becomes something you like to do, even when it's painful. I'm past stage #1: I like writing and I always have. I'm now on stage #2: how do I train myself to become a "marathon writer?" How do I keep myself writing? These are questions more for me than for you, but I'm stating them anyway in the hopes that some (many?) will relate.

Obvious Thing #2: I'm in an industry (i.e. academia) where blogging is becoming an increasingly important part of one's identity. Web presence is not only "a thing, " but a big and important, potentially career-defining thing (The Guardian has written about this, Henry Jenkins sees blogging as a good way to connect with a broader public, and some folks from the LSE find that blogging is the best way to communicate ideas that won't make it through the traditionally slow academic publication timeline very quickly). As someone billing herself as a specialist in digital culture and rhetoric in particular, I've got to be extra-super (supextra?) aware of how I present myself online, how often, and what sorts of things I'm writing (i.e. more relevant hot topics in my field, less whining probably?).

Obvious Thing #3: I'm working on a dissertation.

Given these discrete obvious things, I'm at a cross-roads where I must make a choice: should I blog my dissertation progress? I've read a lot about the process at this point, from this open thread on GradHacker to the Remix the Dissertation webinar last week. Because I like lists, I've decided to lay out some more personal pros and cons, based on info gathered and my own personal circumstances:

Pros:

  • Re: Obvious Thing #2. Here's a way to show people that I know how to do the blog thing! I've got a knack for it! I can write about my work for a "general public!" This is valuable and highly encouraged!
  • It'll keep me reflective and thinking about my writing process the whole way through. The dissertation is a long haul, and there's real value in having an informal space to reflect on ideas that may make their way into a project, but may not.
  • Low stakes. Let's be real: how many people are actually going to read my work-in-progress dissertation blog (to be hosted on a site I've just set up with a free WordPress URL)? Probably my dissertation committee (that's 3), and maybe my boyfriend on a day where he's feeling particularly generous (OK, 4), and my mom will skim it and tell met that I'm smart (So, 5?). This is a good thing. It makes me feel like I'm not revealing to the entire world my trials, pitfalls, and potential mistakes.
  • It'll give me a space to hash out nuggets of ideas that really could turn into potential articles and blog chapters.
  • Choosing which topics to blog about may help me see which ideas for my dissertation are actually useful and interesting. This seems like a potentially silly advantage, but I tend to think that everything is interesting (my co-chair had to tell me to STOP collecting primary texts for my project)... until I actually start writing about it. It's when the metaphorical rubber hits the metaphorical road that I actually can sit back and assess my ideas more clearly.

OK, so Cons:

  • Re: Obvious Thing #1. I don't want to contribute more blog detritus to the world if I don't write regularly (though this is really my own problem and not necessarily a "con" to the whole venture).
  • There's potential for ideas to be "scooped" by random readers and could potentially jeopardize the ability to distribute ideas in things that people have to actually buy, like journal articles or books.
  • I don't want to look like an idiot?
Source: www.hastac.org
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